Green buzz from the show floor

Rainforest-friendly soap, bison fiber shoes, low-waste baselayers, and 7 more eco-friendly breakthroughs for F19
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Wash your down, protect the rainforest

Allied Feather & Down is launching an outdoor industry first: a palm oil-free home detergent that’s formulated just for down. (Palm oil is in environmentalists’ crosshairs because its cultivation causes deforestation in the tropics.) ALLIED worked to achieve Palm Oil Free Certification from the POFCAP (the world’s first International Palm Oil Free Certification Trademark and Certification Program). Their Down Wash launches in specialty shops and online at a price of $10 for a 400ml bottle.

Saving sheep, one shoe at a time

Storied shoemaker Stegmann has been building wool clogs for more than 130 years, but it’s now adding a new mission: preserving rare sheep. To make its new Eco Wool Clogs, Stegmann sources wool from breeds not typically used for that purpose—giving European farmers the financial backing they need to raise and preserve these rare species. Plus, the clog’s entire construction process is chemical, dye, and cruelty free and zero waste, with a supply chain as short as 30 miles.

Going all in

Polartec makes a bold statement for sustainability this show by announcing its intent to introduce recyclable materials and biodegradability across its entire product line. That includes goals to produce the world’s first fully recycled and biodegradable fleece material and waterproof/breathable membrane.

Climate warriors unite

Athletes and scientists talk on a panel at Outdoor Retailer Snow Show 2019.

Athletes and scientists talk on a panel at Outdoor Retailer Snow Show 2019.

Athletes and scientists gathered today for a Protect Our Winters panel on the The Current State of Climate Change and How the Outdoor Industry Can Help. Panelists like skier and Patagonia ambassador Max Hammer and University of Colorado-Boulder professor Jen Kay focused on the damage done by reduced snow totals and warming temperatures and steps we all can take to help. POW’s Lindsay Bourgoine said it’s most important to remember that “Having a carbon footprint doesn’t preclude you from making a positive policy change.”

Another man’s treasure

Fjallraven’s Re-wool initiative reduces the need for hard-to-process virgin wool by reclaiming someone else’s trash. The company takes discarded Italian textile fabrics bound for the garbage and repurposes the fabric for its new Greenland Re-Wool Jacket and Greenland Re-Wool Cardigan, saving energy and resources in the process.

Double the fun

Sole X UBB Jasper Wool Eco Chukka

Sole X UBB Jasper Wool Eco Chukka

Sole and United By Blue are teaming up for a green collab shoe built from the tread up. The Sole X UBB Jasper Wool Eco Chukka combines a rice rubber outsole with SOLE’s new ReCORK recycled wine cork midsole and UBB’s BisonShield insulation. Using bison hair spares it from the landfill, repurposing it into a cool-in-the-summer, warm-in-the-winter insulation—thanks to the fiber’s natural temperature-regulating powers.

Waste not, want not

Apparel manufacturing can generate tons of wasted fabric—but not Smartwool’s new Intraknit Merino baselayers. The 3D-knit, body-mapped baselayers feature an all-new knitting process that cuts fabric waste to nearly zero versus traditional cut-and-sew construction methods.

Cleaner, greener resin

Jones Snowboards at Outdoor Retailer snow Show 2019

A sampling of Jones snowboards with super sap bio resin.

Jones Snowboards swaps petroleum-based epoxy with its natural Super Sap Bio Resin to create one of the most sustainably produced snowboards in the world. The new epoxy will be on three models for the 2019-20 season.

The next big thing

The most important sustainability buzzwords are ones you may not think of: supply chain. Instead of focusing solely on bio-based membranes and recycled fabrics, sustainability experts recommend that brands start paying better attention to sourcing materials closer to home, knowing what chemicals are used in processing, and learning how the fabric is produced to reduce fossil fuel use. 

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