Osprey Stays Ahead of Future Standards with Poco Child Carrier Retrofit

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Cortez, CO – November 24, 2014 – Osprey Child Safety Products, LLC, a leader in creating top-quality, high-performance, innovative packs to comfortably and efficiently carry gear, is proactively offering its Poco child carrier customers a retrofitted Poco Seat Pad free of charge.

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With the seat insert, all generations of the child carrier will meet a new standard set by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). This new standard is expected to become mandatory for child carriers manufactured after January 1, 2015. Providing this retrofitted seat is not required of Osprey but instead Osprey is voluntarily offering this insert free to its customers. Whether or not customers choose to install the Poco Seat Pad, the Poco child carrier is still safe for use when used according to manufacturer instructions.

“We want both our past and current Poco child carrier customers to enjoy miles of fun together on the trail,” said Tom Barney, CEO of Osprey Packs. “With this new insert, we are able to bring Poco child carriers purchased in the past up to the most recent standards.”

The retrofit consists of a wider seat pad that fits on top of the existing saddle. The seat pad can be quickly and easily secured with a strap that clips under the saddle. Installation takes only a few minutes.

Orders for the Poco Seat Pad retrofit kit can be placed at www.ospreypacks.com/pocoseatpad where customers can also find full details about this update including an FAQ and installation video. Customers may also contact Osprey directly via email at pocoseatpad@ospreypacks.com or by phone 1-866-951-5197. Like all Osprey products, the Poco Series is covered for lifetime by the brand’s All Mighty Guarantee.

About ASTM: ASTM is an international standards organization that develops and publishes voluntary consensus technical standards for a wide range of materials, products, systems, and services. The new standard called ASTM 2549-14 was updated to ensure that all framed child carriers will perform even more safely when used according to manufacturer instructions.

About Osprey Packs
Independent since 1974 and still anchored by the design genius of company founder and owner, Mike Pfotenhauer, Osprey Packs has long set the standard for creating innovative, high quality gear carrying equipment. The collection includes packs and bags designed to help adventurers enjoy their outdoor, biking, active everyday and travel pursuits.

The location of company headquarters in Cortez, Colorado, near the rugged San Juan Mountains on the edge of desert canyon country, provides a constant inspiration and a superb testing ground for Osprey products. Osprey also maintains a product development office in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, near the factories where they manufacture their products, ensuring face-to-face relationships and transparency with their suppliers. In 2009, Osprey opened a design office in Mill Valley, California, a hub of design talent and the birthplace of mountain biking. All three of these offices play a crucial role in creating Osprey gear that lasts a lifetime.

Osprey’s customers identify with the brand in many ways, including the product lifetime All Mighty Guarantee, category leading sales, worldwide distribution, dynamic social media communications and content, a strong commitment to the environment and partnerships with inspiring and interesting organizations. Above all, the brand encourages and maintains a direct line of communication on product performance, durability and functionality, which is then incorporated and reflected in every future Osprey pack.

Every Osprey product reflects the company’s commitment to protect the wild places its customers love to explore. For more information, visit www.ospreypacks.com.

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