Alaska Coalition Names Osprey's Gareth Martins as State Representative

Gareth Martins, Marketing Manager for Osprey Packs will travel to Washington D.C. Sept. 9-13 as a state representative of the Alaska Coalition attending Alaska Wilderness Week 2006.
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Gareth Martins, Marketing Manager for Osprey Packs will travel to Washington D.C. Sept. 9-13 as a state representative of the Alaska Coalition attending Alaska Wilderness Week 2006.

The Alaska Coalition, Sierra Club, Wilderness Society, Alaska Wilderness League, and other Alaska groups are co-sponsoring a week of leadership and grassroots activism training in our nation's capitol to support efforts to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) from oil and gas development, and the Tongass National Forest from subsidized timber operations.

Participants at the conference will gain skills for educating and lobbying decision-makers about preserving the Alaskan wilderness. Gareth Martins will be receiving issue briefings, taking part in workshops taught by experienced lobby and communications professionals from the Washington, D.C. area and spend two days lobbying on Capitol Hill.

“Alaska truly represents the Great Wild of America. For too long we have been swayed by scare tactics and misinformation regarding the preservation of areas like the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and Tongass National Forest,” commented Martins. “As a board member for the Colorado Fourteeners Initiative, I have dedicated myself to mitigating the effects of too many people enjoying Colorado's treasure, our 54 peaks above 14,000 feet. I cannot stand by and allow Alaska's treasures to be exploited for reasons that ultimately hurt, rather than help our country.”

America's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge covers 19 million acres above the Arctic Circle in northeast Alaska. It provides calving grounds for the Porcupine caribou herd and is home to polar bears, muskoxen, arctic foxes, wolves, bears, and thousands of migratory birds. The area has been and remains at the center of political debate and controversy ever since President Dwight D. Eisenhower first designated it a wildlife refuge in 1960.

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