Health Notes: No such thing as fit and fat; yoga for arthritis pain

Find out how the latest scientific research can help your business.
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No chance of being fit and overweight or obese
Contrary to previous wisdom, it is not possible to be both fit and fat.

A recent analysis of eight separate studies dating back to 1950 found that was the case. Despite past findings that obese individuals were metabolically healthy if they didn’t have high blood pressure or any other unhealthy metabolic factors, recent analysis shows that those individuals still died earlier than their counterparts of healthy weight.

The results, which were published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, found that excess weight has negative impact even in the absence of negative metabolic health indicators like heart disease, high blood pressure and high blood fats.

Though several overweight people included in the research did not have any symptoms of metabolic syndrome, they were still at risk for heart disease and premature death.

And the earlier you get healthier the better. Another study, published in the European Heart Journal, found that men who were obese but metabolically healthy had a higher risk of heart attack than unfit, lean men. That study said that regular exercise in the teenage years lowers your risk for a premature heart attack by 35 percent.

So what? Just because your overweight and obese customers don’t have any negative metabolic indicators doesn’t mean they’re not at risk for premature death. The only way to live a little bit longer is to get rid of that excess weight and get fit — and the sooner the better.

For the scientifically minded: For the Annals of Internal Medicine free abstract, click here. For the European Heart Journal article abstract, click here.

Relief from arthritis pain another benefit of yoga
According to data from nine separate studies conducted between 2010 and 2013 in both the United States and India, people found relief from stiffness and pain caused by their arthritis by doing yoga. Practicing yoga also helped them reduce their levels of depression and improve physical function, according to the article in the Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

Some of the researchers whose studies were featured in the journal article said that yoga helps by stretching the muscles around the arthritic joints. Experts say if you suffer from arthritis to try more gentle forms of yoga like hatha yoga.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates there are 50 million Americans suffering from arthritis, which causes stiffness in the joints and aching joint pain.

So what: Yoga continues to grow in popularity and as more studies like this start to pop up, so do more opportunities for sales of yoga products like mats, apparel, blocks and the like.

For the scientifically minded: For a free abstract, click here. For the full text, available for a fee, click here.

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