Merchandising Know-How: Eye Catching -- The Art of Product Placement

The physical differences between men and women influence where we place products and position fixtures. You’ve probably heard a million times to “put your merchandise at eye-level.” But at whose eye-level?
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The physical differences between men and women influence where we place products and position fixtures. You've probably heard a million times to “put your merchandise at eye-level.” But at whose eye-level?

The average eye-height of a woman is 59 inches from the floor, while the average eye-height of a man is 64 inches from the floor. So the question remains, what eye-level is best?

On average, customers first notice products when they stand four feet away from a fixture or wall display. Also, it has been shown that the best viewing angle is 15 percent below the horizontal. Consequently, the best average eye-height is 51 inches to 53 inches from the floor. This is the most effective space in which to stock and display products and is referred to as the “impact zone.”

The impact zone contains the average eye-height and is 3.5 feet to 6.5 feet from the floor. Place items that you want noticed first in this zone. They may be new seasonal products, promotional or gender-specific items, or those that have a short shelf life.

The area above the impact zone is called the “top zone” and is 6.5 feet and higher. Products in this space will not be noticed as readily, but after customers view what's below, they will move to this zone. It's a good place to stock extras of what's stocked below or related products.

The “bottom zone” is 3.5 feet or less and is usually the last area customers notice. It's a good place to show items in bulk and back stock of goods you've placed on the wall or adjacent fixtures.

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