New Horizon Treadmill Keeps Track of Your Steps Throughout the Day

Wireless Pedometer Transmits Steps to Treadmill; Automatically Adjusts Workout to Compensate for Steps Taken During Daily Routine
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If you head out the door each morning with bottled water in hand and a pedometer connected to your hip, you're one of the countless Americans “stepping” your way to better health.

The popular “10,000 steps a day” approach to physical fitness is gaining momentum with people who don't have the time, or simply feel overwhelmed, at the thought of scheduled daily workouts.

The 10,000 steps a day approach makes sense for many people because it can be incorporated into their daily lives. You don't have to schedule a trip to the gym, simply take the stairs instead of the elevator, or park your car in the back of the parking lot. Incorporating “steps” into one's daily routine offers many of the health benefits associated with a more traditional 30-minute cardio workout – without having to commit the time to do it.

But achieving 10,000 steps a day can be a lofty goal for many. According to Shape Up America! – a non profit organization dedicated to achieving healthy weight for life – most people take anywhere from 900 to 3,000 steps in a day. The organization conducted their own internal 10,000 steps a day program and came to the conclusion that it's nearly impossible to get in 10,000 steps a day without intentionally going out for a walk or getting on a treadmill.

For those who are serious about getting in 10,000 steps a day, a trip to the office water cooler or a walk down a flight of stairs just won't cut it. The reality is that most people need to supplement their program with some type of physical activity – like a brisk walk around the block or a spin on a treadmill.

One company has come up with a unique way to ensure you're getting your 10,000 steps a day. Horizon Fitness, a manufacturer of treadmills, elliptical trainers and stationary bikes, has developed a treadmill that actually gives you “credit” for steps taken throughout the day – whether you're on it or not. How does it work?

A user wears a wireless pedometer during the day, which comes with the treadmill. At the end of the day, the user wirelessly transmits his or her steps to the treadmill. The treadmill then calculates the steps needed to reach a daily fitness goal, which can be anywhere between 1,000 and 10,000 steps. The treadmill then adjusts the workout to compensate for steps taken throughout the day.

“The treadmill takes the guesswork out of a 10,000 steps a day program,” said Bill Sotis, vice president of product and marketing for Horizon Fitness. “You don't have to pull out a calculator or conversion chart to figure out how many steps you need to take to accomplish a daily goal – the treadmill takes care of that.

Plus, you get the credit you deserve for steps taken during the day. If you had an active day, your workout on the treadmill will be shorter. If you're stuck behind a desk, or home with sick kids, you'll make up for lost steps on the treadmill later in the day. Either way, you will accomplish your goal.”

According to many fitness professionals, accomplishing a fitness goal often comes down to motivation. If an individual sets an unrealistic goal, chances are they won't stick with a fitness routine. If the goal is attainable – and there are a number of ways to accomplish it ��� an individual is much more likely to stick it out.
“We feel that this treadmill makes the 10,000 steps a day program much more realistic for the average person,” Sotis added.

Horizon Fitness' WT 950 Wireless Pedometer Treadmill retails for $1,299 and can be found at MC Sports (www.mcsports.com) or Sport Chalet (www.sportchalet.com). To learn more about the product, visit horizonhealthyliving.com or call 1-800-244-4192.

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