Fifty Public Lands Art Activists Unite to Promote Bears Ears Education Center

The collection of diverse voices shares sacred and common human experiences to inspire awe and respect for public lands.
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Cortez, Colorado, October 16, 2018 - The team behind the 85for85 art activism project celebrating the lands and people of the Bears Ears and Grand-Escalante National Monuments announces a second limited run of the book through November 11, 2018.

Back by popular demand, the full color 8” x 10” book features photography, illustration, and written word celebrating of the majesty and cultural heritage of the desert region found in southern Utah.The different stories from diverse voices across many types of media all share experiences rooted in respect, love, mourning, and hope, as inspired by the Monuments’ cliffs, cave dwellings, and talus-footed towers.

One hundred percent of the sales from this second limited run will directly benefit the Friends of Cedar Mesa Education Center, in Bluff, Utah, which “give[s] the [Bears Ears Coalition] tribes a voice in telling the story of the monument and inspiring visitors to respect” the lands of the Bears Ears Monument. The theme of the Education Center, “Visit with Respect,” is one of the uniting themes found in every artists’ contribution.

With written word shared in English, Diné, and Spanish, the book aims to inspire awe amongst its readers with stories that speak to both sacred and common human experiences. “85for85's mission is and always has been to inspire more people to become advocates and stewards for these incredible places, protecting them forever. What better way to share our love than through the eyes of artists already connected in so many different ways to these lands?” says one of the project founders, Mika Parajon.

The book includes photos from Tyana Arviso, Aaron Colussi, and Marc Toso, artwork from Sarah Uhl, Stephen Rockwood, and Savannah Holder, and words from Hallie Rose Taylor, Kelsey Brasseur, and Dani Reyes-Acosta, amongst many others. Contributors shared over 85 different pieces of creative work, including photo essays, short stories, paintings, drawings, and poems, all to support the preservation and education of natural wonders and ancestral lands of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments.

Available for purchase online through November 11, 2018, find the book for sale at http://85for85.com. Outdoor industry insiders can also make last-minute holiday orders in-person at Outdoor Retailer Winter Market in Denver (November 8 - 11, 2018—for sale at the Osprey booth).

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Media Contact

Mika Parajon
85for85@gmail.com

About 85for85

85for85 is an art activism project whose stories of ancestry, adventure, and conservation share raw experiences of the lands of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments. Representing writers, photographers, illustrators, and designers scattered around the United States, 85for85 unites creatives who care deeply about the protection of public lands together to make something for good.

The book of over 85 collected appreciations, centered on the gems of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments, is available for a limited time through November 11, 2018. In its first limited edition run, 85for85 raised (and donated) over $4500 to the Wilderness Society’s efforts to maintain the original Monuments’ 2016 designation boundary. Mika Parajon, Scott Robertson, and Emma Hershberger created and lead 85for85 from Cortez, Colorado and Greenville, South Carolina, where they all share creative ideas (and jobs) focused on getting outside, connecting to public lands, and funhogging. Connect with 85for85 on Instagram to follow (and share) the journey.

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