Fitness activities show "healthy growth," club workouts trending up, NSGA study reports

An array of fitness activities lead the pack of activities in increases in participation in 2004, with the strongest growth in working out at clubs, the NSGA's most recent sports participation study reports.
Author:
Updated:
Original:

An array of fitness activities lead the pack of activities in increases in participation in 2004, with the strongest growth in working out at clubs, the NSGA's most recent sports participation study reports.

"There has been a trend upward for the last five years in club growth. I'm sure it has a lot to do with different types of clubs being opened now, especially clubs that appeal to the baby boomers who are so much more health and fitness conscious," Tom Doyle, NSGA vice president of information and research, told SNEWS®.

With an 8 percent growth in participation from last year, the annual NSGA survey found that 31.8 million Americans worked out at a club in 2004, ranking it ninth of 45 sports analyzed in the report. The data comes from the "Sports Participation -- Series I and II" reports, which will be available later this month.

Classic fitness activities included in the survey showed from 1 percent to 8 percent growth. Like it has for the past 10 years, exercise walking ranked No. 1 overall of all activities, and was up 3.8 percent to 84.7 million participants.

Following the fitness leader in growth, club workouts, came aerobic exercising, with an increase of 5.1 percent, with 29.5 million participants in 2004. Also showing increases were exercising with equipment (up 3.9 percent to 52.2 million) and running/jogging (up 3.2 percent to 24.7 million). Weightlifting showed the lowest growth, up only 1.4 percent to 26.2 million participants. Filing in for 33rd of 45 activities was tai chi/yoga, up 2.5 percent to 6.7 million.

"Although the fitness percentage increases may seem modest compared to other activities, fitness activities have such a large base that the increase of a few percentage points translates into millions of people," Doyle said.

Doyle speculated that club growth has increased because an improved economy is giving Americans more disposable income to play with.

"I think there is some relationship between the general economic mood which is probably more positive now than it was a couple years ago," he said. "People have money -- and clubs cost money -- and if you're feeling comfortable with your income and feel you deserve to treat yourself, you may decide to become a club member. Then you have these phenomenons, like Curves, which are getting a number of people doing a certain type of workout."

Doyle also said he anticipates the overall fitness trends are going to continue upward for probably another five years, then start to flatten out: "It's going to be a function of aging. The baby boomers are going to age to the point where they will not exercise as much. I don't think they'll stop exercising. I think it's just typical of aging that you cut back a little bit as you get older."

In the NSGA study, a participant is considered someone age 7 or older who takes part in the sport or activity more than once in a calendar year. For information on NSGA reports, visit www.nsga.org, email info@nsga.org or call 1-800-815-5422, ext. 108.

Related

Did you hear?... Club workouts, weight-lifting show top growth over five years: NSGA

Club workouts and weight-lifting led participation growth in fitness-oriented activities over five years, according to the most recent data from NSGA Sports Participation studies. Among the 39 sports and recreational activities surveyed in both 2000 and 2005, the highest-ranking ...read more

Weightlifting shows biggest growth in fitness activities, NSGA reports

Weightlifting has powered up the list of popular fitness activities done each year by National Sporting Goods Association, reaching No. 9 overall in 2005 participation, up from 13th a year earlier and 17th when the group first surveyed it in 2000. And, not surprising here, it ...read more

NSGA Participation Study -- Fitness Activities, Most Team Sports Grow

MOUNT PROSPECT, IL – Exercise walking, which experienced 1.5% growth in 2005, remains the No. 1 participation activity surveyed by the National Sporting Goods Association (NSGA), a position it has held since 1990. Data contained in NSGA's annual “Sports Participation – ...read more

Leisure Trends reports fitness activities grew strongly from 2000 to 2004

Participation in activities for fitness -- indoors or out -- has grown more than any other sport, according to a recent report by Leisure Trends, a research organization that specializes in sports and fitness. And women still lead the way, while yoga has seen the greatest growth ...read more

New NSGA Report: Established Sports and Activities Show Huge Participation Increases

Weightlifting was the fastest growing of the 41 sports and activities surveyed by the National Sporting Goods Association (NSGA) in 2005. With 35.5 million participants, weightlifting participation increased a whopping 35.4%, a change usually reserved for the lesser-participated ...read more

New NSGA Participation Report: Women Dominate Most Fitness Activities

MOUNT PROSPECT, IL – Among sports participants age seven and older, females constitute a majority of participants in four of six fitness activities surveyed for 2006 by the National Sporting Goods Association (NSGA), according to data in the new NSGA Sports Participation ...read more

Did you hear?... NSGA says: Kayaking/rafting tops growth over five years

Kayaking/rafting led participation growth over the past five years, according to data from NSGA Sports Participation studies. Among the 39 sports and recreational activities surveyed in both 2005 and 2000, kayaking/rafting grew 141 percent from 3.1 million participants in 2000 to ...read more

NSGA Finds Fitness Activities Dominate Top Ten Participation Activities in 2006; Exercise Walking No. 1

MOUNT PROSPECT, IL – Exercise walking, which experienced 1.5% growth in 2006, remains the No. 1 participation activity surveyed by the National Sporting Goods Association (NSGA), a position it has held since 1990. Data contained in NSGA's annual “Sports Participation – ...read more

Active kids more likely to be active, healthy adults

Backing up what we all know intuitively with quality research in a quality peer-reviewed journal is always nice: Participation in organized sports by school age children is indeed a predictor of physical activity in adulthood, according to a December 2003 study in Medicine & ...read more