Energizer bunnies we ain't: Study says many lose workout motivation in two weeks

They DON'T keep going. That's the word about people who have resolved to get fit for the New Year. In fact, by the time you read this, nearly one in four who started a program this year are back on the couch and, by the end of the month, more than half will have fallen off the fitness bandwagon, if you believe a recent study by the Energizer battery company.
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They DON'T keep going.

That's the word about people who have resolved to get fit for the New Year. In fact, by the time you read this, nearly one in four who started a program this year are back on the couch and, by the end of the month, more than half will have fallen off the fitness bandwagon, if you believe a recent study by the Energizer battery company.

Of course, equipping your portable fitness devices, from CD players and heart-monitors to pedometers and calorie counters, with Energizer batteries will help.

Just kidding. Although we're sure Energizer would like you to think that because it is "the official battery of 2007 New Year's resolutions." When asked who crowned it with that title, we were told it came from the company "as a creative way to call attention to the company as a dependable, long-lasting power source for most battery-powered fitness devices."

Ah, marketing genius strikes, says SNEWS®, the official news source for everyone without exception for 2007. Just kidding. Because we know you know that. OK … really… just kidding.

Seriously, the "Keep Going" fitness study Energizer undertook, despite its cute "official" moniker, offered some useful tidbits:

>> Biting the dust -- Though they start off the New Year with a big bang, 22.4 percent of the people who have just begun their fitness training stop going after two weeks. After a month, another 32.5 percent stop, and 32 percent stop after two months. That leaves 6.1 percent still sweating it out after six months, with only 7 percent falling into the "They Keep Going" category.

>> Getting electronic -- When asked about fitness devices for people who are serious about staying in shape, 42.5 percent of the responding trainers recommend heart rate monitors, followed closely by calorie counters at 41.7 percent, body fat analyzers at 39.0 percent and pedometers at 38.6 percent.

>> Finding your groove -- Surveyed trainers noted two major factors behind sticking with it: Getting into a routine works (said 39.5 percent) and making a workout enjoyable (said 34.6 percent).

>> Going west to keep going -- People in the West (91.1 percent) are most likely to go to the gym after the New Year or otherwise workout, while those in the Southeast are least likely (66.7 percent) to get thee to a workout.

>> Finding a good reason to get fit -- Way more than half of people (58.3 percent) start a fitness program to lose weight. But 24.4 percent of those ages 36 and older seek fitness help for health reasons, while the primary driver of those ages 18-35 (14.8 percent) to seek fitness is to help bulk up and tone muscles.

One side note on reasons to workout: The study found acute differences between regions. For example, only 5 percent of Northeasterners turn to a trainer to "maintain their figure," while more than three times that many (16.4 percent) of those in North Central states do. Either the eastern part of the north doesn't care about its figure or the central part is overly concerned. Also, a big fat goose egg (zero percent) of those in the North Central states workout out to train for an athletic event, but 5 percent of those Northeasterners do.

"We know it's tough to stay motivated right after the holidays," Anne Bannister, director of marketing for specialty batteries at Energizer, said in a press release. "We want to educate people about the devices proven to help during a workout, as well as the batteries that power up those health devices."

Of COURSE you do.

P.S. The survey was conducted online for Energizer by Impulse Research among a random sample of 319 professional fitness trainers, carefully selected to match U.S. population demographics. It was conducted in December 2006.

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